At inquest, Adib’s father pleads for justice

Mohd Kassim Abdul Hamid, father of the late fireman Muhammad Adib Mohd Kassim, arrives for the public inquest at the Shah Alam Court March 21, 2019. — Picture by Mukhriz Hazim
Mohd Kassim Abdul Hamid, father of the late fireman Muhammad Adib Mohd Kassim, arrives for the public inquest at the Shah Alam Court March 21, 2019. — Picture by Mukhriz Hazim

SHAH ALAM, March 21 — The father of the late fireman Muhammad Adib Mohd Kassim today pleaded for justice and appropriate action against those responsible for the events leading to his son’s death.

Taking the stand as the 23rd witness in the inquest of his son’s death, Mohd Kassim Abd Hamid, 63, remained calm during today’s proceedings before Coroner Rofiah Mohamad Mansor.

“I understand my son died in a riot, I plead for action by the authorities be taken against those who planned and participated in the riots.

“I want to just ask for justice concerning my son’s death, I plead to all those concerned to judge the death of my child in fairness,” said the farmer from Alor Setar, Kedah.

Mohd Kassim told the court Adib’s death was a great blow to his family in terms of their emotional and financial wellbeing.

“Adib was always ready to help; when he comes back to the home town he will help us financially too.

“He never spoke much but would always listen to advice from others,” he said.

Mohd Kassim told the inquest about his experience on the night of the riots at the Sri Maha Mariamman temple, in Subang Jaya, saying he was alerted by the Fire and Rescue Department station chief and then left for Kuala Lumpur at around 2.30am.

He explained how Muhammad Adib’s entire body was bruised the night he arrived at the Subang Jaya Medical Centre (SJMC) and was barely recognisable.

“His initial condition was bad, he was unconscious, covered in bruises and obviously in a critical state.

“I could see there were bruises on his chest arms, calves, scratches on his fingers, and felt swelling in several places on his head, with a wound behind his earlobe,” he said.

Mohd Kassim, who was with Adib prior to his death at the National Heart Institute, said the family had hoped then that he was recovering.

“We were able to communicate as he could write on the whiteboard, and nod to us when we asked him questions for a period of around five days.

“There were also several other firemen colleagues who came to visit Adib, but most of them remained outside the treatment room and viewed through the glass window,” he explained.

Mohd Kassim said he recalled a senior fireman asking for his permission to pose several questions to Adib concerning the events on the night of the incident.

When asked if he had spoken to Adib about the night of the riots, he said no.

“We didn’t want to stress him out further,” Mohd Kassim told government lawyer Hamdan Hamzah.