Kit Siang: Nik Aziz saw non-Muslim as allies, but PAS now makes them targets

DAP adviser Lim Kit Siang poses for a photograph after an interview in Sheraton, Petaling Jaya May 27, 2018. — Picture by Firdaus Latif
DAP adviser Lim Kit Siang poses for a photograph after an interview in Sheraton, Petaling Jaya May 27, 2018. — Picture by Firdaus Latif

KUALA LUMPUR, March 10 — DAP’s Lim Kit Siang has lamented today that PAS now sees non-Muslims as political targets, unlike the allegedly moderate and compassionate party it was under the late Datuk Nik Abdul Aziz Nik Mat’s spiritual leadership.

Lim said non-Malay-Muslim communities and groups are feeling threatened that they may be made scapegoats by PAS and Umno for many problems occurring in this country.

“PAS was a moderate and compassionate party believing in justice for all under the revered [Nik Abdul Aziz] when he was still alive,” Lim said in a statement.

“Sadly the PAS under Nik Abdul Aziz that sees non-Muslims as an ally against injustice and corruption is now no more, but replaced by an extremist PAS that sees non-Muslims as a target to attain political power.”

Nik Aziz died in February 2015 from prostate cancer.

Then Pakatan Rakyat, consisting of PKR, DAP and PAS, broke up in June that year after his demise.

The Iskandar Puteri MP today asked whether PAS is willing to shed its purported extremist image by withdrawing and apologising for its allegedly unconstitutional and seditious remarks.

He gave the example of PAS president Datuk Seri Abdul Hadi Awang’s previous insistence that Malaysia should be led by the Malay-Muslims as they are the dominant community, therefore the group should hold the top decision-making positions in the Cabinet.

"If PAS is not willing to do so, how can PAS blame non-Muslims and non-Malays from Peninsular Malaysia as well as Sabah and Sarawak, for feeling gravely threatened when this fundamental right enshrined in the Federal Constitution, which has never been questioned before, is now openly attacked by both PAS and Umno?" Lim asked.