Johor-Singapore bus fares up as much as 50pc after toll hikes

Despite protests by transport companies and frequent commuters of the Causeway, Malaysia raised the toll fees for vehicles leaving the country at its southern gateway in August with taxis paying RM8.20 for a round-trip while heavy good vehicles are charged RM33.30. — Today pic
Despite protests by transport companies and frequent commuters of the Causeway, Malaysia raised the toll fees for vehicles leaving the country at its southern gateway in August with taxis paying RM8.20 for a round-trip while heavy good vehicles are charged RM33.30. — Today pic

KUALA LUMPUR, Oct 3 — Johor-Singapore cross-border bus operators will raise fares by up to 50 per cent following increases to toll rates at both ends of the Causeway.

The New Straits Times (NST) reported today that the revised rate will take effect beginning Monday.

The daily reported that the first to announce the fare hike was Handal Indah Sdn Bhd, the company which runs Causeway Link public bus services.

NST reported that while two other operators — SBS Transit Ltd and Singapore-Johore Express (Pte) Ltd—are yet to announce their new rates, the quantum is expected to be the same.

According to the daily, Causeway Link will increase fares for the Johor Baru (JB)-Kranji route from RM1 to RM1.50, while the fare from JB CIQ (Customs, Immigration and Quarantine Complex)— Queen Street will be raised from RM 2.60 to RM 3.40, a hike of 31 per cent.

The fare for cross-border taxi services from JB to Singapore may also go up to RM20, a RM5 increase from the current charges.

Despite protests by transport companies and frequent commuters of the Causeway, Malaysia raised the toll fees for vehicles leaving the country at its southern gateway in August with taxis paying RM8.20 for a round-trip while heavy good vehicles are charged RM33.30.

Buses were the hardest hit by the increase, with toll charges shooting up from RM6.10 currently to RM33.30 for a round trip.

The Singapore Land Transport Authority later announced that it is matching Malaysia’s prices on the oldest bridge linking the two countries that were once part of the same federation, adding that it customarily revises the rates if and when Malaysia does.

The two countries are also connected by another bridge known as the Second Link, and rates there remain unchanged.

* An earlier version of this story had inadvertently left out the word "Transport" in a line referring to the Singapore Land Transport Authority. The error was not intentional and is much regretted. The line has since been amended to refer to the proper relevant authority.

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